Interview with HelloYoga.com

A few months ago I was interviewed by Dylan Robertson of HelloYoga.com.  We filmed it at a sweet spot up in the sky on the 21st floor of the Roppongi Midtown Residences.  For me, this turned into an exercise in self reflection, as this was one of my first filmed interviews.  To watch oneself speak and move is a rare and revealing experience. For everyone else though, I think, this is a nice introduction to the work I’m doing in Japan.

I’ve included the transcript in both English and Japanese below. 日本語訳は以下の通りです。

ANY CHARACTER HERE
ANY CHARACTER HERE

ANY CHARACTER HERE

Tell us a bit about where you’re from.
I grew up in America. I was born in the Midwest, a kind of farm country area, but for someone with my craving for adventure, I needed to get out of there. I eventually moved to northern California in San Francisco. I lived there for fifteen years, and then I came to Japan just for a short time, but ended up staying a lot longer than I was going to.

How long has it been so far?
Almost six years.

You’ve been involved a lot in the yoga scene in San Francisco. How would you compare that to the yoga scene here in Tokyo?
There are a lot of differences, but I think in San Francisco, it’s much more of a real lifestyle choice, and it seems like people have a lot more time. Of course, there are a lot of folks that are working in the IT industry or artistic people or designers who have a much more flexible time schedule. And in Japan, folks tend to work with the company, and you work from morning until night, and you stay at the office. There are a lot more people in San Francisco who are working from home, and that changes the dynamic and people’s ability to practice yoga a lot. I would like to see that kind of freedom in Japan. I don’t know how it would happen.

What are yoga studios in San Francisco like compared to Tokyo?
They’re bigger, but the yoga we get here in Tokyo is not coming from India so directly. It’s really bouncing back from America. I think the American influence on the culture of the yoga scene is really significant, especially in the studio, the style, the physical area, and what you see, very similar.

Do they have showers in the studios there?
Some do, some don’t. It depends. Bikram Yoga studios have showers. But San Francisco is a pretty dense city, too. It’s not built up as high as Tokyo, but it is pretty dense. It’s surrounded on three sides by water, so there is not a lot of building outwards that they can do there. So you do get these pretty compact little studios.

Tell us a bit about the style of yoga that you’re teaching.
In Tokyo, I’m teaching two things. I’m teaching regular weekly yoga practice sessions. I call that freestyle yoga, although it’s not really the perfect name for it, but I wanted to express something that has a little more spaciousness and freedom than the more traditional forms of yoga. I do lead folks through sequences, but in general, it’s a little more organic movement than you would find in classical yoga. I try to turn students towards their own experience in the yoga practice.

You’re teaching somatics?
Somatics is a topic: a way or manner of inquiry into human movement or human experience, which is more of the first person. It’s more about what we’re experiencing inside our bodies, contrasted with a more scientific third person view, where we’re examining the body through tools and measuring. Anatomy is a good example. I teach anatomy in a lot of teacher trainings. The tradition that we inherit in learning anatomy is the medical tradition, the scientific tradition. And really, that’s the study of the human body being cut apart; we cut apart dead people and we look from outside.

A somatic exploration, or learning about anatomy somatically, would be learning through your own feeling or your own sensation. We might look at pictures, or we might develop an idea about it in our minds, but a lot of the somatics learned comes through our own experiences. You could say it’s an experiential learning.

You’re into Body-Mind Centering. Tell us about that.
Body-Mind Centering is a particular approach to somatics that looks at human movement and human health, very specifically through each of the body systems and body tissues and also developmentally—all the little building blocks that each of us goes through until adulthood to develop an adult style of complex human movement.

You’ve been on several trips to Germany to study BMC. Why did you go to Germany?
As you filter up the scale of this learning, there are fewer and fewer opportunities to study at more advanced levels. So right now, Germany is the only place I can go to do the more advanced work in Body-Mind Centering and the somatic work. I go there once or twice a year and work with my teachers and an international group of people. We spend three or four weeks together, going deep into our experience and learning about the body in different ways.

You’ve been teaching somatics as part of Body-Mind Centering here in Tokyo. How have the Japanese students adapted to these teachings?
We kind of get two camps. We get folks who have a very specific idea of what they want. Generally, I teach it in a yoga context so when you’re developing, or you’re moving from some kind of experience inside your body, it doesn’t always look like a classical yoga posture. But sometimes, when I get folks coming in thinking, “I want to do a triangle pose just like I saw Christy Turlington do it,” they get a little confused, I think. And then, of course, form, or kata, is so important in Japan. Sometimes, people get a little uncomfortable with these forms we are working with. But people can get into it if they’re patient.

And then on the other side, I think because yoga itself can be very formal, and because Japanese culture can be very formal, when I give people an opportunity to really act from their own experiences, I think they find that very liberating. And so they get a lot of excitement about it. It tends to kind of go in extreme directions.

You are now based in Tokyo. But before, you were in Kyoto. Tell us about Kyoto.
Every time I mention Kyoto, people are like, “ii-neh!” (that’s nice!). And it is. It’s a beautiful place. It’s surrounded by mountains and forests, and there are old temples everywhere, and I think there is a general respect for the old traditions and meditation. I mean, not totally—it’s a modern city. Just in terms of environment, it’s more like that. It’s a quieter place, and I find it a wonderful place to live in. Maybe I’ll go back there someday. I still lead retreats and do workshops there every couple of months.

As a professional yoga teacher, is it easier to build a career in one of the smaller cities outside of Tokyo like Kyoto? Or are there more opportunities here in Tokyo just because there are more people here?
Tokyo is very saturated, that’s for sure. There are a lot of inexperienced yoga teachers—a lot of yoga teachers and a lot of yoga studios. And we’re seeing it now. I think it’s also getting a little Darwinian; it’s filtering out. So, Tokyo is tough, but I get the feeling Tokyo is tough for everybody, no matter if you’re a yoga teacher or a designer or a photographer. People want to come here, and the best people come here.

But having said that, I do think things tend to sprout out of the big cities. But what I saw in America especially, and I see it here too, is that the neighborhood yoga studios are mushrooming now. And I think that’s really where the future is for teachers, because people don’t want to have to go to the closest big train station or central Tokyo. If it’s going to be a real practice and something that’s important in their lives—something that will change their body and develop their mind—they need to be having it accessible and close by. So, I can see people from my teacher trainings years ago starting little spaces and tiny little events in their neighborhoods locally. And I think that’s very good.

I know in the U.S., talking in terms of the yoga industry, the smaller studios have trouble competing when large fitness center chains open up nearby due to their different economies of scale.
Yeah, that happens. In some ways, it’s difficult for some teachers who don’t get involved with that. But, on the other hand, it seems like yoga continues to develop and grow. And the more diverse, the more people that practice it, the more exposure it has, the more diverse the groups are there practicing, results in all kinds of niches. The yoga world becomes like a mountainous terrain, going up and down, with a lot of contours. And in the end, I’m not really sure that there is a net positive or negative of that effect. The only thing I will say—and this is perhaps my personal pet peeve—I hate to see a real corporatization and commercialization of yoga. And I know that happens.

It’s just part of our society, but I hate to see it getting pulled out of the context where people don’t have a real sense of the heart of what yoga is. Of course, there is that entry level where people are just coming because it makes them feel good, or they want to come and reduce their stress or get a little more fit. That’s cool, but there’s all this other stuff back there that is very interesting and wonderful. It frustrates me a little bit when people don’t realize all the other things that yoga has to offer.

I understand you also have a background in dance.
When I was in high school, I was playing football, and my best friend and I had heard that professional soccer players run and dance to improve their dexterity on the field. So, of course, wanting to be as professional as possible, we started taking dance classes, and we started with jazz but ended up doing hip-hop and break dancing. It was a lot of fun. It did open my eyes a lot to the world of dance, and I continued in small ways since then, never really taking it so seriously. But, during university, I started doing African dancing, more contemporary styles, and contact improvisation. So, dance has always been there in the background. Here in Japan, I’m hoping to break in to butoh and see what that world is like.

People outside of Japan may not be familiar with that genre of dance, butoh.
I find a lot of Japanese are not so familiar with it, too, these days. Butoh is a kind of post-war ‘60s and ‘70s avant-guarde Japanese dance form. I guess you could call it really expressionistic. And as with somatics, it really works from automatic movement that arises spontaneously in the body. They developed their dance through that, as opposed to something like ballet, which is more about refining a perfect external form. Butoh is much more visceral and primal; it’s not always so pretty.

And sometimes they’re naked when they’re performing, right?
They often are. You can see the reference to the old Japanese art forms like the white face, and actually, they’ll do whole-body makeup. I think they are going back to that very first empty slate kind of intention.

Changing topics, I know that you have been leading various yoga teacher training courses. Tell us about your course modules and the contents that you are teaching.
I’ve done a few two-hundred-hour Yoga Alliance certified teacher trainings. Since I moved to Tokyo, I’ve put that on the back burner and have been focusing more on professional trainings for people who are already teachers.

I’ve got a thirty-hour breath training, where we go deeply into, not just pranayama, but natural styles of breathing and breathing anatomy, and also how breathing affects and works in tandem with our movement, and also doing anatomy trainings for yoga teachers. Those are all plug-ins to our basic yoga teacher training program.

What types of backgrounds do your students come from? Do they have very well-rounded yoga educations when they come to you, or do you think they have certain parts missing? Is there a trend you’re seeing here in Japan?
Mostly in terms of experience—folks often don’t have the same depth of experience in yoga. With a lot of the programs that I took for my own teacher trainings in the US, almost everybody had been doing yoga for at least a couple of years, but more commonly, it was five, six, or seven years sometimes, before they felt like, “This is something I want to do professionally,” or even just to deepen their practice through more advanced training. I just think yoga hasn’t been around in Japan so seriously for as long as it has been in America. And here, there’s also a tendency for it to be less of a transformative practice and more of a physical culture, a kind of exercise. It’s still here, but not as much.

In terms of what you see unfolding in yoga communities outside of Japan, you just recently came back from Germany, and you go to San Francisco and other places. What trends do you think we can expect to come to Japan from abroad?
I think the center of modern yoga is really the English-speaking world nowadays. It’s not really India. That’s the root, but there is so much vibrant activity happening in America, which I know best, and now in Europe too—really pushing yoga forward in terms of the academic study of its history and cultural aspects. We’re seeing a lot more translations of ancient yogic texts, and people are really examining yoga in a modern context by asking, “How does that part of yoga apply to us as modern people?” and really bringing it in and trying to do something that’s really alive in the modern world. It seems that yoga churns through the Western, or the English-speaking, world before reaching Japan. Japan is still getting it in the secondary wave. I just don’t see the same kind of research and true depth of practicing and saturation in the culture here. So many Americans are practicing and learning in such a big way these days. But it’s happening in Japan; it’s coming here too.

What is it like as a yoga teacher here? Do you find that you are able to teach fully in English or do you have to adapt the way you speak?
When I teach my regular classes, I teach in a mixture of English and Japanese. A lot of people come to classes because they want to practice their English and listen to English in combination with body movements. So, it really enters them on a physical level, rather than if they were just sitting in the eikaiwa, in English conversation school, and talking in a completely disconnected way from the rest of the world. But I use a lot of Japanese, and in the end though, it really comes down to just connecting mind-to-mind and heart-to-heart, body-to-body in a nonverbal way. I do a lot of adjustment, demonstration, and it works. I think it’s important to develop something a little bit outside of the linguistic part of teaching. But when I teach my workshops and things which have more technical necessities, I always bring a translator to help me.

What’s it like working with a translator? Do you have any tips for teachers coming from abroad who may not have worked here much before?
I know foreign teachers who come here and just teach like they always teach. In the beginning, I was using nonprofessional translators. So, I was frustrated, and the translators were stressed out, which really didn’t help the yogic process.

So, I developed a kind of rhythm where I would say things in little sound bites and give a pause, and they could work through it. And I developed that into a kind of teaching style that included the translator. The teaching became more of a conversation between me and the translator and the students, which felt much nicer. I like a more casual experience, and I like to work it out as a group. It feels good for everybody, even if the translation from English to Japanese is not always exact. And, if I take breaks, it gives me a chance to think about what I’m going to say next and be more precise and clear about what I’m going to say. So, my advice is to take your time. Take breaks. Let some space come in, and include the translator in a much more relational way. And the translators seem to appreciate it.

Tell us a bit more about the types of people you have seen in your classes in terms of demographics.
Well, mostly women, of course. Yoga seems to be seen as the women’s activity here in Japan. Although, maybe I can say 5 percent men, maybe less. I would love to see more guys. I feel somehow that yoga in Japan has really become identified with something that women do. Maybe not so much with the more active styles. I do teach a very vigorous and active style, but no one else is teaching it, so I don’t get the kind of marketing pushing from behind.

What do you think we can do to encourage more men in Japan to try yoga?
Let them work fewer hours. It seems like guys are just working all the time. If they had the time to practice yoga, they could. But there are a lot of men teaching. There are some very visible male yoga teachers. I guess we should just try to be good role models for guys.

I know that you have a very active practice doing private lessons. Tell us about your private sessions.
A lot of people come to me for yoga therapy and to do some of the somatic therapy work, and I do bodywork as well. We do a combination of movement, asana (yoga postures), and bodywork. People come for injuries, people come because they just want to have more attention, or they haven’t done yoga, and they are maybe a little embarrassed or shy to go to a class. But one-on-one, it’s a little more flexible for them. I get people who come to me because of my experience and my knowledge of the body who want to perfect their yoga postures but can’t get that kind of support from most teachers or from public classes. So, I get people from all over who just feel, for some reason, that they need some extra support.

Tell us about the type of bodywork you’re offering.
My background is in some of the osteopathic forms—very subtle adjustment of the bones and the soft tissues. I’ve studied Thai massage and I like to work with people on the floor, and they do the deep stretches. It’s getting to be very popular with the yoga people these days. In fact, I’m teaching Thai massage workshops these days as well. I have a lot of tools, and it ultimately depends on the people who are coming to me—what I feel and what they feel they need. Sometimes, they just want to get a good, deep squeezing—squeezing out the trapezius. I’ve given regular massages, and I’m really good at that.

Do you find that people in Japan come up with different physical conditions than you might find in people from other countries? In Japan, the older generations grew up sitting on the floor.
Hips are not an issue as much as they are in America, for sure. But shoulders are. With Americans, generally, flexibility tends to be the issue. For a lot of Japanese folks that I work with, it tends to be–– not a lot, but I see more issues with stability—people who are overstretching or aren’t able to really develop a central kind of stability, shoulders especially, that lets them do these deep yoga postures. In order to do a deep stretch, you’ve also got to be incredibly stable, or you might damage your joints.

Based on your six years of experience here in Japan and being very active in the Japanese yoga community, what would you like to see developed more in Japan? And also, what do you think is something which other communities abroad could learn from Japan?
I think community in general is something that could be more conscientiously developed here. In a way, what you’re doing seems to be teasing that forward, although it still seems to be evolving. In other words, places or opportunities outside the asana practice, in the studio where people can share yogic values or even sustainability, health, and all that. I’d like to see more of that somehow. But it’s coming, maybe. I would like to see more retreat centers. It’s really hard to find a place where people can go and where I could take my students, spend a good weekend, that has a good asana space that’s out in nature. I’ve found a few up here in the Kanto region, but as far as I know, there were none done in Kansai. That would be nice.

In terms of Japan for the rest of the world, it’s not so much in yoga but the character of the Japanese people and their warmth and their flexibility, in terms of person-to-person – that sense of wanting to have a harmonious relationship among everyone, and the kind of sweetness the people have here. Also, the fact that everybody cleans up after themselves — that’s a big lesson for the rest of the world.

ANY CHARACTER HERE

ANY CHARACTER HERE

ご自身の事を少し教えてもらえますか?
私はアメリカで育ちました。生まれはミッドウェストという田舎町です。誰もが感じるように冒険をしたくてたまらなかったので、この町を出て行く必要がありました。そして、ついに北カリフォルニアにあるサンフランシスコに移り、そこで15年間暮らしました。その後、短期滞在の予定で日本へやって来ましたが、当初予定していたよりも長く滞在することになりました。

日本にはどれくらいいらっしゃいますか?
もうすぐ6年になります。

あなたはサンフランシスコでのヨガに深く関わってこられましたね。東京でのヨガとの違いは何でしょうか?
たくさんの違いがありますね。サンフランシスコでは多種多様な生活スタイルがあり、もっとゆったりと時間をすごしているように思います。もちろん、IT業界、アーティスト、デザイナーなど比較的時間をフレキシブルに使える人達がたくさんいるからかもしれません。日本では朝から晩まで会社で働き、ほとんどの時間をオフィスで過ごしています。それに比べ、サンフランシスコでは日本よりも在宅で働いている人が多いです。この違いが、ヨガの練習への意欲と能力を変えています。日本でもこういった自由さがあればと思いますが、難しいでしょうね。

東京に比べてサンフランシスコのヨガスタジオはどんな感じですか?
サンフランシスコのスタジオは東京に比べるともう少し広いです。東京のヨガはインドの影響を受けていませんね。アメリカからかなり影響を受けています。特にヨガスタジオ、スタイル、身体的の分野にもアメリカのヨガが、多大に影響していると思いますので、その点ではとても似ていると言えるでしょう。

サンフランシスコのスタジオにはシャワーが設備されていますか?
設備のある所とない所があります。スタジオによりますね。ビクラムヨガにはシャワーがあります。サンフランシスコもかなり密集した都市です。東京のように高い建物はありませんが、かなり密集しています。サンフランシスコの地形は三方向が海で囲まれているので、外側にはここほど建物がありません。その為、スタジオはかなりコンパクトです。

貴方が教えているヨガのスタイルを教えて下さい。
東京では2つのヨガを教えています。毎週、ヨガの定期クラスで教えています。フリースタイルヨガと呼んでいますが、まだパーフェクトな名前ではないと思っています。伝統的なヨガのスタイルよりも、少しだけ広々として自由な感じを表現したかったのです。生徒の皆さんにはシークエンスに従ってもらいますが、一般的にクラシックなヨガより、もう少し機能的な動きがあります。生徒達がヨガの練習により、それぞれ個々の経験をしてもらおうと思っています。

ソマティクスを教えていらっしゃいますね?
ソマティクスとは、身体の動きや経験を探求する方法です。どちらかと言えば一人称、つまり自分自身の探求です。道具やメジャーなどで身体をはかるような科学的な第三者的観点と対比させて、もっと私たちの内なる身体を感じることです。解剖学がいい例です。私はたくさんのティーチャーズ・トレーニングで解剖学を教えています。私たちが学習した解剖学で受け継いでいる伝統は、医学的伝統であり、科学的伝統でもあります。実にそれは切り離された人間の身体の研究であり、亡くなった人々を切り離し、外側から見るという事です。

ソマティクスの探求やソマティクス的に解剖学を学ぶということは、独自の感じ方や感覚を通じて学ぶことです。絵画を見て感じたことを広ろげて考えることもあるでしょう。しかし、ソマティクスは個々の経験から学びます。経験に基づく学びと言えるでしょう。

ボディ・マインド・センタリング(BMC)にも力を入れていますね。BMCについて教えて下さい。
ボディ・マインド・センタリングとは、人間の本質的な動きや健康に着目したソマティクスへの特有なアプローチです。とりわけ身体のシステムや体内組織、また発達の観点から言うと、私達が成人までに経験する、人間の身体の複雑な動きをつくる構成要素へのアプローチと言えます。

BMCを勉強するために何度かドイツに行かれたそうですね。なぜドイツに行かれたのですか?
この学問が今より広まれば、上級レベルで勉強できる機会がますます少なくなります。まさに今、ボディ・マインド・センタリングとソマティクス・ワークを更に上級レベルで勉強できる所は、ドイツだけなのです。1年に1度か2度ドイツに行き、師匠と海外から来た人達のグループと共に練習します。3週間か4週間ほど一緒に過ごし、私達の経験を深く追求し様々な方法で身体の事を学習します。

東京でボディ・マインド・センタリングの一部として、ソマティクスを教えていらっしゃいますね。日本の生徒達にこの教えがどのように浸透していますか?
2つのグループが存在します。ひとつは、何を求めているかを明確な生徒達のグループです。一般的に、ヨガのコンテキストを使って教えますが、成長過程にいるときや経験を身体に取り入れる段階において、いつもクラシックなヨガのポーズを行うわけではありません。生徒さんが、たまに「クリスティー・ターリントンがしていたような、トライアングルポーズをしてみたいです」と言う事があるので、少し戸惑うことがあるようです。もちろん、フォームや型は日本ではとても重要だと思います。だから生徒達は、私達が行っているフォームに少し違和感を覚えるようです。しかし、これは我慢強い人だけが習得できるのです。

また一方で、ヨガはとてもフォーマルで、日本文化もとてもフォーマルと言えると思います。生徒に独自の経験に基づいて行動する機会を与えると、解放されていると感じているようです。生徒はかなり刺激を受けて、究極の方向に向かいます。

現在は東京をベースにされていますが、以前は京都にいらっしゃいましたね。京都について教え下さい。
私が京都について話すといつも、「いいね!(That’s nice!)」と言われます。その通りです。京都は素晴らしい街です。山と森に囲まれ、由緒あるお寺が至る所にあり、古い伝統と思考への敬意があると思います。つまり、現代的な街というわけではないのです。環境の観点から、更にそう思います。閑静な場所なので、住むには最高の場所だと思います。いつか京都に帰るでしょう。今も数ヶ月ごとに、京都でリトリートやワークショップを開催しています。

プロのヨガインストラクターとして、京都のような東京郊外の小さな都市でキャリアを積むのは簡単ですか?それとも人口が多いという理由で、東京にはチャンスがありますか?
東京は飽和状態です。確かにそうです。経験の少ないヨガインストラクターを含め、たくさんのヨガインストラクターがいます。ヨガスタジオも多くあり、まさに現在の様子です。また少しずつ、外からしみ込んでいくダーウィン説のようです。だから東京はとても厳しい街ですが、東京は、ヨガインストラクターであれ、デザイナーや写真家であれ誰に対しても厳しい街だと感じています。人はこの街に来たいと思い、また最も優れた人達が集まります。

しかし、こう言いましたが、大都市以外でも、同じ事が増える傾向にあると思っています。特にアメリカや東京で起きている事は、現在、地域のヨガスタジオは急増しているという事です。これが、ヨガインストラクターの未来だと思います。もう生徒達が近くの主要な駅や東京都内へ行く必要がないからです。もし真剣に練習することや、身体の改善、精神世界を発展させるような、なにか生活に重要な事をしたい場合、アクセスしやすい近くにあるスタジオが必要になります。だから、数年前に小さなスペースでスタートしたヨガ・ティーチャーズ・トレーニングや、地方で行ったイベントにも、生徒は来てくれます。大変素晴らしいことだと思います。

アメリカのヨガ業界では、支店がたくさんある大手のフィットネスセンターが近くに出来ると、小さなスタジオは経済状況の違いにより競争するのが難しいと伺っています。
そうですね、そういう事が起きています。ある意味、大手に所属していないインストラクターには困難な状況でしょう。しかし言い換えれば、ヨガがより発展し成長し続けていると言えますね。そして選択肢が増えれば、更に多くの人がヨガを実践できます。より多くメディアが取り上げれば、様々なグループがヨガを実践できます。結果として、ニッチな分野にも入り込めるのです。ヨガの世界は上がったり下がったりする山脈地帯のようです。最後に、この影響がポジティブな事かネガティブな事なのかわかりませんが、ただ言える事は、恐らく私の個人的な不満ですが、ヨガの本格的に企業化、商業化されるのは見たくありません。でも、そうなっていくでしょう。

それは社会生活の一部ではあるのですが、人々がヨガの真の心を持たない状況になりつつあるのを、見たくありません。もちろん、気分転換やストレスの発散、健康になる為に気軽に参加するための初心者クラスもあります。これはいい事ですが、本当の意味で楽しくて素晴らしい要素が全て後回しなります。人々がヨガの本当の素晴らしさを気がつかないのは少し残念です。

ダンスの経歴もあるそうですね。
高校生の時にサッカーをしていました。大親友と私は、プロのサッカー選手達がサッカー場での機敏さを磨くために、走ったり踊ったりすると聞いた事がありました。もちろん、プロになりたいと思っていたので、私達はダンスクラスを受け始めました。ジャズダンスから始まり、最後はヒップホップとブレイクダンスで終えました。ダンスはとても楽しかったです。ダンスの世界を通して視野が広がりました。その時からずっと少しダンスを続けていますが、あまり真剣にすることはありません。学生時代に、現代的なスタイルのアフリカンダンスを始めて、即興に触発されました。だから私のバックグランドには、いつもダンスが存在します。日本で舞踏を練習して、その世界がどんな感じなのかを見たいと思っています。

日本以外の人には舞踏は馴染みがないと思います。
最近、舞踏は日本の人にも馴染みがないと思います。舞踏は戦後の60年代や70年代の前衛的な日本舞踏の一種です。舞踏は本当に表現的であると言えるのではないでしょうか。ソマティクスと同様に、無意識から生じる自動的な体の動きに連動します。更に優美なフォームのバレエとは対照的に、舞踏は形から発展しました。舞踏は、とても直感的で根本的ですが、いつも優美なわけではありません。

裸で演じることがありますよね?
裸で演じることが多いですね。白塗りで昔の日本のアートの形を引用していると言えるでしょう。実際は、全身を白く塗ります。一番初めの中身がなく、意思のようなスレートに戻っていくと思います。

話題を変えましょう。貴方は様々なヨガ・ティーチャーズ・トレーニングを開催されていますね。コースの内容を教えて下さい。
今までに、全米ヨガアライアンス200時間のティーチャーズ・トレーニングコースを数回開催しました。東京に移ってからは、ティーチャーズ・トレーニングを後回しにして、すでにインストラクターである人達を対象にしたさらに専門的なトレーニングに集中してきました。30時間の呼吸トレーニングがあります。それはプラナヤマだけでなく、自然な呼吸法と呼吸の解剖学を追求するトレーニングです。また呼吸が解剖学と合わせてどのように影響を受け作用するのか、ヨガインストラクターにとっては解剖学のトレーニングを受けているとも言えます。これらはベーシックなヨガ・ティーチャーズ・トレーニング・プログラムに全て通じています。

どのようなバックグラウンドの生徒達が来られますか? すでにヨガ学に精通している人達ですか?それとも、ある部分の知識がかけていると思う人達ですか?日本の傾向はありますか?
経験という点において、ヨガの同じ経験を持つ人はいません。私がアメリカで受けたティーチャーズ・トレーニングのプログラムには、ほとんどの人が、少なくとも数年間はヨガの経験がありました。「専門的なヨガをしたい」、もっと上級トレーニングで更にヨガを深めたいと思う前に、5年か6、7年の経験を持つ人が多かったです。アメリカでそうあったように、日本でもヨガはまだそれほど知られていません。また、あまり変化のない実践や、エクササイズのような身体的訓練である傾向にあります。

一応あるにはありますが、そんなに多くありません。

ドイツから最近戻って来られて、サンフランシスコ等の場所へ行かれ、貴方が見て来られた日本国外で展開されているヨガ・コミュニティから、どんなトレンドが日本にくると考えますか?
現在、ヨガの中心は英語圏にあると思います。実はインドではありません。インドはヨガのルーツですが、私が一番よく知っているアメリカには、更に活気に満ちた活動が行われています。今はヨーロッパでも、ヨガの歴史や文化的側面の専門的研究の点で、更にヨガに注目しています。様々な古代ヨガの原文は翻訳され、「現代人として、ヨガは私達にどのように影響するか?」と質問することによって、ヨガは近代文脈で調査されている。ヨガは日本に入ってくる前に、西洋の文化や英語圏の文化を通じてかき乱されてきたように思います。日本では、いまだ、2回目の波の最中です。ここでは、同じ種類の調査や本当に深く掘り下げた実践、サンサルテーションはあまり見ません。最近は、たくさんのアメリカ人がこのような大きな方法で学び、実践していますが、日本でも同じことが起きています。ここにも来ています。

ここのヨガインストラクターはどんな感じですか?完全に英語で教える事ができますか?それとも日本語を話す必要がありますか?
レギュラークラスでは、英語と日本語をミックスして教えています。ほとんどの生徒達は、英語の練習と身体の動きの両方を目的にクラスにやって来ます。彼らが英会話スクールで、世界と完全に切り離されてただ座っているよりは、体で英語を習得できるでしょう。私は結構日本語を使いますが、最後には心と心、ハートとハート、身体と身体をつなげる言葉ではない方法になります。私はアジャストやデモンストレーションをよくしますので、うまく行きます。指導の一部である言語の表面を少し展開させることが、重要だと思います。しかし、ワークショップでさらに多くの技術的な事を教える必要がある時は、いつも通訳を連れて行きます。

通訳と一緒に働くのはどんな感じですか?日本で働いた事のない外国から来られたインストラクターに対して、なにかアドバイスはありますか?
日本に来た外国人インストラクター達は、いつも彼がやっているのと同じように教えています。初めは、アマチュアの通訳者にお願いしていたのですが、とても大変でした。通訳者も疲れてしまい、ヨガの練習にはなりませんでした。

そこで、小さな音を刻み、少し間を置くリズムで話すようにしました。それはとてもうまく行きました。私は、通訳者を交えた指導スタイルを開発できたと思います。教える事は、私と通訳者、さらに生徒達との会話になり、それはもっと心地良いです。

もっとうちとけた経験が好きですし、グループでするのが好きです。たとえ英語から日本語への通訳がいつも完璧ではなくても、皆にとって心地よいのです。間を置けば、次に何を言うかを考える機会になりますし、話す事がもっと明確になります。ですから、ゆっくりと時間をかけてやって下さいと言うのが私からのアドバイスです。間を置いて、スペースを空けて、通訳の方を含むことを取り入れて下さい。そうすれば、通訳の方が感謝してくれるでしょう。

人口統計学的に、貴方のクラスに来る人はどんなタイプの人なのか教えて下さい。
えーと、もちろん女性が多いです。日本では、ヨガは女性のアクティビティーだと思われているようですね。おそらく男性は5%かそれ以下だと思います。もっと男性にヨガをしてもらいたいです。なぜか日本でヨガは、女性がするものだと認識されているようです。多分あまり活動的ではないスタイルのヨガは、そうかもしれません。私はとても力強い活動的なスタイルのヨガを教えていますが、他の誰もこのスタイルを教えてないので、ライバルがいません。

日本でもっとたくさんの男性にヨガに挑戦してもらうには、どうしたらいいと思いますか?
男性の働く時間を少なくしましょう。男性はずっと働いているように見えます。もし彼らにヨガを練習する時間があれば、きっと練習するでしょう。でも、男性のヨガインストラクターもいます。何人かは、有名な男性のヨガインストラクターです。私達が男性のインストラクターにとって良いロールモデルになればいいのだと思います。

個人レッスンではとても活動的な練習をされていますね。個人レッスンについて教えて下さい。
たくさんの人が私のヨガセラピーを受けにやって来ます。また、ソマティクスセラピーもすることになります。ボディワークもします。アーサナ(ヨガのポーズ)とボディワークの動きを組み合わせます。怪我をした人達も来れば、もっと注意を向けて欲しいからという理由で来る人もいます。あとは、ヨガをしたことない人や、クラスに参加するのが恥ずかしいというシャイな人など。一対一ということは、もっと融通が利きます。その中にはヨガのポーズを完璧にしたいと思って、私の経験や身体の知識を求めている人がいます。しかし、他のインストラクターや普通のクラスではサポートが難しいので、私の所に来ます。ただ感じる人、なにかの理由で特別なサポートが必要な人達ばかりです。

どんなタイプのボディワークをしているのか教えて下さい。
私の経歴には、骨と軟部組織の非常に微妙な調整で形成される整骨療法があります。タイ・マッサージを勉強しました。床の上で人と一緒に働くのが好きですし、深くストレッチもできます。最近はヨガをする人達に、とてもポピュラーになりつつあります。最近、私もタイマッサージワークショップを開催しています。私にはたくさんのツールがありますが、私が感じる事と、私の所に来る人達が感じ必要な事は、最終的に彼ら次第です。時には、彼らは僧帽筋からひねり出すように、深く絞り出したいだけなのです。レギュラーマッサージも施します。私のマッサージは本当に上手ですよ。

他の国の人々と比べて、日本の人々の身体的な違いはありますか?日本では昔の世代の方達は、床に座って育ちました。
アメリカに比べ、腰回りに関してはそんなに大きな問題ではありません。確かに、上背部は大きな問題ですね。一般的にアメリカ人には、柔軟性が問題である傾向にあります。私が一緒に働いている日本人多くは、その傾向がほとんどありません。もっと問題なのは安定性だと思います。限度を超えたストレッチをしている人や、中心にある種の安定性を身につけられない人がいます。特に上背部は、深くヨガのポーズをする上で重要です。深くストレッチをするためには、非常に安定していなければなりません、そうでなければ関節を痛めるかもしれません。

日本での6年間の経験をベースに、日本のヨガ・コミュニティーで大活躍されていますね。日本でもっと発達したものは何でしょうか?また外国のコミュニティーが日本から学ぶ事は何かありますか?
一般的なコミュニティーは、忠実に発展したのではないでしょうか。ある意味、まだ展開しているように見えますが、この先に問題があると思われます。言い換えればアーサナの練習する場所や機会以外で、ヨガの重要性や持続性、健康までもシェアできるスタジオはありません。こういうのがもっとあればいいですね。でも多分、増えていくのではないでしょうか。もっとたくさんのリトリートセンターが開設されるといいですね。生徒達を連れて行けるような、自然の中でアーサナができるようなスペースがあって、楽しい週末を過ごせる場所を探すのは本当に難しいです。関東地方で数カ所見つけましたが、関西エリアではまだ見つかりません。そうなればいいですね。

他の国にとって日本は、ヨガの分野に限ってではなく、日本人の性格と温かさや、人対人との点での柔軟性は、調和の取れた関係を持ちたいという感覚であり、優しさがあると思います。また、ヨガが終わったあとの掃除は、他の国は大いに学ぶべきことです。

Advertisements

~ by 00davi00 on 0, July 13, 2012.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s